The freshman survival guide

Convocation for the class of 2020 on August 28, 2016. (Douglas Kilpatrick / Zovko Photographic LLC)

Orientation leaders had only so much time – and one day less than previous years – before the semester started to reveal all insider tips for a quick integration into college. Jack Alden ’20, Mackenzie Lawlor ’20 and Mac Erb ’20 expressed only some of the worries most college students have had at one point:

“We went to Gilbert’s and didn’t know what to swipe for meals,” Alden said.

“I have an FYS for two and a half hours,” Lawlor said. “I worry about how I’m going to pay attention for that long.”

“We’re trying to find the [parties] that will let freshmen in,” Erb said.

Dining halls options are often the first point of interest three (or two) times a day. Everyone has their specific tastes, but what upperclassmen may agree on is that options change just about every semester. Even if you fall in love with a dish, it may switch to only flex next semester, and disappear altogether the next. There’s always Wawa. And its coffee can help with those long classes.

For workaholics or procrastinators, the 1 a.m. library closing time may hit sooner than you think. Finding a place to study that doesn’t close early – but can still be quiet – is a challenge. Some clever students have found ways to stay in the quiet areas of Pardee, Oechsle Hall (“old Oechsle”–not to be confused with “new Oechsle,” the Oechsle Center for Global Education) or the basement of the Kirby Hall of Civil Rights (not to be confused with the two other Kirby buildings on campus) at night.

Easton’s semester highlight may be the Bacon Fest planned for Nov. 5-6, but the public market and farmer’s market can hold you off until then. Don’t want to talk down the hill? You can wait for the college to carry out the plans for an elevator.

College Hill will offer ample events for all sorts of audiences, and the calendar of events emails are probably the best notification you could get for your future suggestions. You may feel tempted to unsubscribe from those emails – it’s a delicate balance between spam and informativeness.

As for parties, they’ll come to you eventually. Pard Glow usually happens this semester, as well as the 1000 Nights Dance.

 

About Ian Morse

Ian '17 was the managing editor of The Lafayette. He wrote on topics including money, student life and crime. He studied history & math-econ.

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